micdotcom:

More giant holes have formed in Siberia, here’s why

 It turns out that scary, mysterious gigantic black hole discovered by oil workers in Siberia several weeks ago might be even more concerning than we even thought.

In findings that have seriously alarmed environmental scientists, two more chasms have recently been discovered, leading experts to believe they’re part of an alarming trend.

Why scientists are worried about their origins | Follow micdotcom

goodmorningmonroe:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Gif (SansSouci / SS Issue N.1 from Ditroit)

Source:vimeo.tumblr.com

SansSouci is a new art book including works of more than 40 contemporary artists. The theme of the first edition is the ‘bestiary’ and the exorcism of human ancestral fears through their artistic representation. Our video is a metaphor for the process of transformation of the animal in an art installation.

Watch this Video:

SansSouci / SS Issue N.1 from Ditroit on Vimeo.

I love this!

tulipnight:

Lightning by mario.marin56 on Flickr.

xysciences:

Pendulums of different lengths swinging. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Pendulums of different lengths swinging. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

wolverxne:

Razorback Loch Ard Gorge, 12 Apostles,  - Australia | by: {Jacqui Barker}

wolverxne:

Razorback Loch Ard Gorge, 12 Apostles,  - Australia | by: {Jacqui Barker}

sagansense:

startagainwithabrandnewname:

SAVE ALL THE CATS :’(

The photographer responsible for the above photograph is Mattias Klum. He spoke about this experience during National Geographic Live! Watch him explain this face-to-face encounter HERE.

radivs:

Star Trails by Weerapong Chaipuck

1 | 2 | 3 | 4

starstuffblog:

If you didn’t download this week’s StarStuff, here’s what you missed…

StarStuff episode 685 is now out
Listen to it on the best ABC radio stations across Australia.
On Science 360 Radio in the United States.
On line as audio on demand and as a podcast at:
http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff
or as a free download from iTunes

This week’s show…..

Rosetta seeing double
The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission to land on a comet has continued to surprise scientists with the discovery that the target comet is actually two objects not one. The discovery means comet 67-P is made up of two distinct bodies that have melded together to form what astronomers call a “contact binary”.

Galactic evolution models in doubt
There are growing concerns about new observations which contradict standard cosmological models and challenge astronomers understanding of how the universe works and how galaxies evolve and grow. The findings raise questions about how gas flows across the universe, and more radically, the possibility of problems with the laws of gravity and motion.

Most distant Milky Way stars
Astronomers have detected the most distant stars in the Milky Way galaxy. The stars are more than 50 percent farther from the Sun than any other known star in the galaxy, and five times more distant than our neighbouring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud.

Going with the flow Volcano style
Scientists have for the first time mapped the pathway taken by molten rock as it moves from its creation at subduction zones to the magma chamber of an active volcano. The researchers identified a region in the upper mantle where subducting basaltic seafloor crust begins melting and making its way up to a 16 kilometres wide melt pool, 8 kilometres below Mount Rainier in the Pacific northwest’s Cascade Mountains.

Supercheap internet broadband satellites launched

Arianespace has successfully launched four communications satellites on a Russian Soyuz rocket from the European Space Agency’s Kourou spaceport in South America. The satellites are part of a new constellation in an unusual equatorial low Earth orbit designed to provide cheap internet access to the three billion people in under developed countries without reliable, high-speed Internet service.

StarStuff is broadcast weekly on the best ABC Radio stations in Australia,
On the National Science Foundation’s Science 360 Radio across the United States.
As audio on demand and as a free podcast at….
http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff


New StarStuff- Super-Earths discovered in stellar cluster- Solar system found with 3 habitable zone planets- Spiderweb catches scientists-voyager update-IRIS launch
http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff
#space #science #astronomy #physics #NASA #ESA #Roscosmos #Arianespace
#CERN #Mars #JPL #Spitzer #Hubble #Sgr A* #Milky Way #Galaxy #chandra #SOHO #particle #supernova #Blackhole #cosmology

wnderlst:

Garnet Lake, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California | Blake DeBock

wnderlst:

Garnet Lake, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California | Blake DeBock
fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/27/14 - A Heavenly Sight

The Moon, Mercury, and Venus are the crowning headpieces for this fantastic image taken just before sunrise at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (also known as ATCA). Located near Narrabri, New South Wales, this array consists of six radio telescopes making up one of the highest resolution telescope arrays in the world.

Mercury is the highest and smallest of the three objects seen in this image, after that, the Moon and Venus are engaged in their own celestial dance which played out gracefully over the next few nights.

From: http://bit.ly/1l4BB4E

Image Credit: Graeme L. White and Glen Cazens

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/27/14 - A Heavenly Sight

The Moon, Mercury, and Venus are the crowning headpieces for this fantastic image taken just before sunrise at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (also known as ATCA). Located near Narrabri, New South Wales, this array consists of six radio telescopes making up one of the highest resolution telescope arrays in the world.

Mercury is the highest and smallest of the three objects seen in this image, after that, the Moon and Venus are engaged in their own celestial dance which played out gracefully over the next few nights.

From: http://bit.ly/1l4BB4E

Image Credit: Graeme L. White and Glen Cazens